Infertility Treatments and Developmental Delays


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For couples who have difficulty conceiving, in vitro fertilization and other infertility treatments can make the dream of starting a family a reality. But as with any "artificial" means, speculation regarding the effects of giving Mother Nature a helping hand can weigh heavy on the minds of prospective and new parents.

The results of a recent study serves to put those minds at ease.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH), a division of the US Department of Health and Human Services, announced yesterday in a press release that a baby conceived as a result of infertility treatments is no more likely to have a developmental delay than a baby conceived without such treatments. The findings, resulting from a study conducted by NIH, the NY State Department of Health and other institutions, were published online in JAMA Pediatrics

“When we began our study, there was little research on the potential effects of conception via fertility treatments on U.S. children,” says Edwina Yeung, Ph.D., an investigator in the Division of Intramural Population Health Research at NIH’s Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). “Our results provide reassurance to the thousands of couples who have relied on these treatments to establish their families.”

While the study currently provides results for children through age 3, it will continue to monitor the children through age 8.

About the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD): The NICHD sponsors research on development, before and after birth; maternal, child, and family health; reproductive biology and population issues; and medical rehabilitation. For more information, visit the Institute’s website at http://www.nichd.nih.gov.  

About the National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH, the nation's medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIH is the primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and is investigating the causes, treatments and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit www.nih.gov.

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About This Blog

Myra Wright has been the editor of Piedmont Parent since 2007 and is mom to three kids, ages 16, 13 and 8. Here, she blogs about parenting as well as news and events for Piedmont Triad parents.

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