2 Questions That Must Be Asked When Considering a Special Needs Summer Camp


Published:

Associate director of Camp Simcha Special, Rivkah Reichmann, suggests the two most important questions parents they need to ask when selecting a summer camp experience for their special needs child.

Question 1: Will the camp meet your child's health and safety needs?

Health and safety are the most important concerns. Parents should ascertain that the camp's facilities are appropriate. If the child needs a wheelchair or walker, there should be easy access to every building so that the child can participate in all aspects of camp life. Equally important, maintenance and cleanliness standards must be high.

Parents should research the camp's medical program: Are there staff members who can deal with day-to-day needs and emergencies? Does the camp have emergency procedures? What about medication? Injections? Does the camp feel confident that its medical staff can deal with your child's health requirements? Do you?

Question 2: Will the camp meet your child's social and emotional needs?

Summer camp is about friends and fun, but it's also about growth and self-enhancement. The best camp for your child will allow him or her to shine through friendships and new skills. When the choice is between a "normal" camp and one designed for children with special needs, parents should consider the child's social life throughout the year. Children who have to work to keep up may do better in a camp where everyone is working at their pace.

"Sometimes, children with illnesses or disabilities are the only kids who are sick in school. They are labeled. They feel left out. They may have few friends. These children may do better in an environment of peers, where all the children are struggling with similar challenges," says Reichmann. "They learn to appreciate their own strengths and differences. They are no longer isolated. The 'bump' they get at camp may be enough to make a difference all year long."

Camp Simcha Special is a camp for chronically ill children and teens in Glen Spey, NY. Reichmann has counseled hundreds of parents since the camp was established in 2001. Email her with your questions: info@chailifeline.org

Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit ModuleShow Tags

Related Content

15 Things to Do This Weekend in the Triad (June 9-11)

Weekend events, activities, and fun things to do for kids of all ages in Winston-Salem, Greensboro, Kernersville, High Point and surrounding area.

Local Students Assist with Development of New Peppercorn Theatre at Kaleideum Play

"The Sky Game" opens Friday, June 16 at Delta Arts Center in Winston-Salem.

Free Movies for Families in the Triad

Free movies for kids, teens and families in Winston-Salem, Greensboro and Kernersville
Edit Module

About this Blog

The Daily Post

Hot topics in the realms of parenting and family life.


About This Blog

Myra Wright has been the editor of Piedmont Parent since 2007 and is mom to three kids, ages 16, 13 and 8. Here, she blogs about parenting as well as news and events for Piedmont Triad parents.

Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module Edit ModuleShow Tags
Edit Module

Newsletter Sign-Up

Stay connected to what's going on for kids and families in the Triad by signing up for our FREE e-newsletters!

Subscribe

Edit ModuleShow TagsEdit ModuleShow Tags Edit ModuleShow Tags

Annual Guides

Education Guide

The all-new 2015-2016 Education Guide is packed with everything parents need to know to navigate more than 500 education options and resources in the Triad, including area preschools, private schools, public school systems, charter schools, boarding schools and academic resources.

GPS [Go. Play. See]

It's your complete family guide to Triad living. Parents are busy and on the go. Use this guide to help you explore all this great area offers for families in Winston-Salem, Greensboro, High Point and surrounding communities.

Exceptional Child

For parents of kids with special needs, finding help and support can be challenging. We've compiled valuable resources for Triad parents in our latest annual publication, Exceptional Child, which is also available as a digital guide.